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Raising the Minimum Wage for Working Men and Women in California and the Rest of America

Jobs Now Coalition's View: Many Will Benefit from Beefier Minimum Wage

Raising Minnesota’s minimum wage to $9.50 an hour would mean a raise for 360,000 working Minnesotans and would mean significant gains in purchasing power for women and people of color, according to a Jobs Now Coalition report.

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Raising Minnesota’s minimum wage to $9.50 an hour would mean a raise for 360,000 working Minnesotans and would mean significant gains in purchasing power for women and people of color, according to a Jobs Now Coalition report. The analysis, completed in collaboration with the Economic Policy Institute of Washington, D.C., looked at the number of Minnesota workers whose wages are below $9.50 as well as those slightly above this mark who likely would see a raise due to what economists call the “spillover effect,” as employers adjust pay scales upward.

Although the number of women employed in Minnesota is about 150,000 fewer than men, a greater number of women are working low-wage jobs. As a result, the majority of the 360,000 workers who would benefit from a $9.50-an-hour Minnesota minimum wage, 57 percent (or 202,133 workers), are women.

A stronger minimum-wage policy would boost purchasing power among Minnesota women by nearly $256 million annually. This would come at a time when wages overall have been stagnant and with median household income declining since 2000 by $5,400 in constant 2011 dollars. The minimum wage itself has been losing purchasing power since the late 1960s, falling to $7.25 when it should be more than $10 adjusted for inflation.

• Category: National • Tags: John Clay